TDMA Transmission Overview

TDMA, or Time-Division-Multiple-Access is a very effective way of allowing a lot of radios to share one radio channel.  Used extensively in GSM cellular and APCO public-safety systems, TDMA excels at allowing quick and reliable access to radio channels.  Raveon’s M7 series of GPS tracking radios use TDMA to send GPS position information, status, and data. It allows 2-10 times more radios to share a radio channel than conventional carrier-sense methods.  This allows 2-10 times more tracking radios on one channel, as compared to radios that do not have TDMA capability.

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Data Radios & Remote Irrigation Control

A dataradio is a commonly used technology in today’s society. From baby monitors to GPS tracking systems, at least one dataradio can be found in almost every home, business, and vehicle in the United States. At first, the process in which a vhf dataradio, a wireless dataradio, or other forms of data radios operate can seem complicated. However, in reality, the operational process of a dataradio is actually quite simple. In order to achieve it purpose, a dataradio must contain two components: a transmitter and a receiver. The dataradio transmitter and receiver must contain an antenna on each device. The transmitter will take the data or information and alter each of its three components into a single radio wave. These components include the frequency, amplitude, and a phase. Once converted, the single radio wave will be transmitted through the air to the dataradio receiver through its antenna. The data radio receiver accepts the single radio wave through its antenna and decodes it and converts it back into a physical form of information. This information can include written information or data, audio, images, video, and more.

 

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How to Obtain an FCC License- Narrow Band Data Radios

Obtaining an FCC license to use a narrow-band radio channel is not difficult at all.  In fact, the FCC has listed over 300 ,000 license holders in the Land Mobile Radio service alone. Raveon’s M7 radio modem operate on radio frequencies that are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).  In order to transmit on these frequencies, you are required to have a license issued by the FCC. This article provides the information you need to obtain an FCC license for your organization.

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GPS Tracking Service Comparison: RF vs. Cellular

Common GPS vehicle tracking systems use “cellular” GSM/GPRS based transponders. Once the device calculates position from the GPS satellites the transponder transmits the position to the cellular GSM/GPRS network of receivers (cell towers) in the area.  At this point the GSM/GPRS system operator transports the data to your output device. Obviously the network operator charges a fee for this service, and is in control of your data as well.

 

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Data Radio Modems

Wireless modems are used to send data between two or more locations. Raveon’s long range VHF data radios and UHF data radios are capable of communicating up to 100 miles, with typical distance in the 10-40 mile range. The data the Raveon modem communicates may be telemetry signals from a transducer, remote control signals, computer communications, GPS position, or a host of other digital messages. Various Input/Output connectors are available including USB, RS232, RS485, RS422, and digital logic levels. Raveon designs its data radio modems with 32-bit micro-processors enabling these products with more features and capabilities than most any other radio modem.

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